Al-Rubut

Al-Rubut are places used for multiple uses; some are designated for worship, and others are schools for tuition. Some are built for a certain group of people to live in. In the Old Town, there are 7 rubut, including Al-Kurd, Al-Mardini, Al-Hamwi, Al-Mansouri, and other rubut.

  • Pick a point from the map
  • Al-Ribat Al-Zamani (Al-zamania School)

    Landmark History:
    In the Mamluk era.

    Reason of the name:
    Related to the builder Khawaja Shams al-Din Muhammad bin Omar bin Mohammed binaAlzaman Damascene "ibn zaman".

    Builder Name:
    Al - Khawaja Shams Al - Din Muhammad Bin Omar Bin Mohammed Bin Al - Damashqi "ibn al zaman"

    Details of the shape:
    This building consists of two floors with an entrance characterized by its huge Mamluk character, the height of the two floors, white and red stones, decorated with a striped text and topped by Almuqarnasat.

    After this entrance there is a cross-vaulted garage leading to an open courtyard. in this square there is a staircase leading up to the courtyard others have around a number of retreats, as some reportedly mentioned thirteen rooms in it, in addition to utilities, utilities and vestibule.

    Additional Information about the landmark:
    According to the documents of the Foundation for Revival of Heritage and Islamic Research, the function of this bond is to house strangers and the poor who come to Jerusalem and feed them, or to teach the jurisprudence of the Shafii doctrine.
    Or to hold parties on religious occasions and holidays and to distribute sweets and food consisting of meat, salt, wheat and oil, In the middle of the tenth century AH / AD 16th century AD 6598 - the Ottoman currency - in addition to the way of its management and exploitation, or its employees.

    Their affairs and their role in the daily life of Jerusalem who were often members of the Kana’ani and Al Afifi groups.

    The inscription above indicates that Khawaja Shams al-Din Muhammad ibn Umar ibn Muhammad ibn al-Din al-Damasqi waqf it in 881 AH / 1479 AD.
    Some documents reveal that this ligament subjected to restoration and reconstruction several times throughout its history, and in 1912, the conditions of Ribat deteriorated and the municipality ordered that it vacated until the endowments in Jerusalem restored, reconstructed in spite of its failure to do so. However, a group of them took it as their home, in reference the function identified by the waqf.

    An Overview of the Landmark:
    It's name Related to the builder Khawaja Shams al-Din Muhammad bin Omar bin Mohammed binaAlzaman Damascene "ibn zaman". It built in In the Mamluk era by Al - Khawaja Shams Al - Din Muhammad Bin Omar Bin Mohammed Bin Al - Damashqi "ibn al zaman".
    This building consists of two floors with an entrance characterized by its huge Mamluk character, the height of the two floors, white and red stones, decorated with a striped text and topped by Almuqarnasat.

    After this entrance there is a cross-vaulted garage leading to an open courtyard. in this square there is a staircase leading up to the courtyard others have around a number of retreats, as some reportedly mentioned thirteen rooms in it, in addition to utilities, utilities and vestibule.

    According to the documents of the Foundation for Revival of Heritage and Islamic Research, the function of this bond is to house strangers and the poor who come to Jerusalem and feed them, or to teach the jurisprudence of the Shafii doctrine.
    Or to hold parties on religious occasions and holidays and to distribute sweets and food consisting of meat, salt, wheat and oil, In the middle of the tenth century AH / AD 16th century AD 6598 - the Ottoman currency - in addition to the way of its management and exploitation, or its employees.

    Their affairs and their role in the daily life of Jerusalem who were often members of the Kana’ani and Al Afifi groups.

    The inscription above indicates that Khawaja Shams al-Din Muhammad ibn Umar ibn Muhammad ibn al-Din al-Damasqi waqf it in 881 AH / 1479 AD.
    Some documents reveal that this ligament subjected to restoration and reconstruction several times throughout its history, and in 1912, the conditions of Ribat deteriorated and the municipality ordered that it vacated until the endowments in Jerusalem restored, reconstructed in spite of its failure to do so. However, a group of them took it as their home, in reference the function identified by the waqf.

     

  • Al-Ribat Al-Hamawi

    Landmark History:
    Before the year 748 AH / 1342 AD

    Reason of the name:
    Named after Aladdin Hamawi, who made it waqf

    It's Location in Respect of the Old Town:
    At al qatanine gate.

    Additional Information about the landmark:
    The ribat has several suspended places, including: four grain stores located in the line of Al qatanines gate, and shops one of the same location stores and the grand market (Asouq Kabeer), the Ribat composed of two ribat, one for men and the other for women.

    An Overview of the Landmark:
    It's At al qatanine gate. It was named after Aladdin Hamawi, who made it waqf and built before the year 748 AH / 1342 AD.
    The ribat has several suspended places, including: four grain stores located in the line of Al qatanines gate, and shops one of the same location stores and the grand market (Asouq Kabeer), the Ribat composed of two ribat, one for men and the other for women.

     

  • Ribat Al-Kurd (Hawash Al-Shehabi / Ribat Al-Shahbani)

    Landmark History:
    In the Ayyubids period.

    Reason of the name:
    It called the Ribat al-Shehabi after the Shehabi took over the state from 1817 to 1983.

    Builder Name:
    During the reign of Saladin.

    It's Location in Respect of the Old Town:
    In Al-Hadeed Gate, adjacent to the wall of the western Al Aqsa Mosque, specifically to the right of the outside of Al-Hadeed Gate, down the Jewel School and across the Argonne school.
     
    Details of the shape:
    -It has a small entrance on the sides of stone benches known as "Al-Maksala" leads to a narrow corridor covered near the entrance to the entrance and widens the corridor when reaching an open courtyard surrounded by a group of rooms and vacations.
    -It is an Islamic building whose purpose is for people to stay in it at the gates of Al-Aqsa Mosque, where families come from all places, interconnected and staying there for long periods.
    -This Ribat continues to function according to the conditions of the Waqf for several centuries until it becomes a school in Jerusalem.
    -The Ribat al-Kurd is the closest Islamic building to the Dome of the Rock and is only 300 meters away.
    -It is one of the tall buildings, some of the legitimate arguments and documents of the Heritage and Islamic Research Foundation refer to its patronage and reconstruction.
    -The proceeds of the curfew was designated in Jerusalem to the poor, pilgrims and Jerusalemites, and to the family of Ibn al-Dweik, and this before turning into a house inhabited by a group of Al-Shihabi.
     
    Additional Information about the landmark:
    The most serious thing facing this historical landmark is the excavations carried out by the forces of the Zionist entity behind the Aqsa Mosque and below, which led to a defect in the foundations and parts of it and cracked walls.
    The reformist Jews took a place to pray there since 1969 and tried to control it.
    In 1971, there were some landslides due to these excavations, and the entity set up pillars to delay its fall.
    In 2012 it dismantled to expand the area in an attempt to create a new order in Ribat, the "Jerusalem Development" project is responsible for the restoration.
    Number of excavations, tiling and restoration currently carried out in an Israeli attempt to turn it into a walled Al-Buraq, believing that there are stones from the Temple Mount to become a gathering place for extremist Zionists during the holidays and the rest of the year.
    In the year 2013, the ribat subjected to major attacks, the staff of the Israel Antiquities Authority, despite the refusal of the Jordanian government and the Islamic Waqf, refused to do so.

    The Zionist forces guarded it; the workers erected a high wooden scaffold and claimed that they were doing their work in the wall.
    The building also witnessed a daily occurrence of the extremists who call themselves "Little Kotel", during which they perform their religious rituals, the staff of the Israel Antiquities Authority, on the first day, collected the papers that they were putting together.

    The Jews were among the stones of the western wall in the Shehab Valley and began to partially encircle the wall and then removed the tiles they had laid under the Qantara Place the iron staves, placed an old tile-like tile in its place.

    The Islamic Waqf Department denied the claims of the Israeli occupation that the "Ribat al-Kurd" is a holy place for the Jews because it is a permanent property inhabited by the Shihabi family and the Jews have no right to it.

    An Overview of the Landmark:
    It's in  Al-Hadeed Gate, adjacent to the wall of the western Al Aqsa Mosque, specifically to the right of the outside of Al-Hadeed Gate, down the Jewel School and across the Argonne school. It called the Ribat al-Shehabi after the Shehabi took over the state from 1817 to 1983.
    It was built During the reign of Saladin, in the Ayyubids period.
    It has a small entrance on the sides of stone benches known as "Al-Maksala" leads to a narrow corridor covered near the entrance to the entrance and widens the corridor when reaching an open courtyard surrounded by a group of rooms and vacations.
    It is an Islamic building whose purpose is for people to stay in it at the gates of Al-Aqsa Mosque, where families come from all places, interconnected and staying there for long periods.
    This Ribat continues to function according to the conditions of the Waqf for several centuries until it becomes a school in Jerusalem.
    The Ribat al-Kurd is the closest Islamic building to the Dome of the Rock and is only 300 meters away.
    It is one of the tall buildings, some of the legitimate arguments and documents of the Heritage and Islamic Research Foundation refer to its patronage and reconstruction.
    The proceeds of the curfew was designated in Jerusalem to the poor, pilgrims and Jerusalemites, and to the family of Ibn al-Dweik, and this before turning into a house inhabited by a group of Al-Shihabi.
     
    The most serious thing facing this historical landmark is the excavations carried out by the forces of the Zionist entity behind the Aqsa Mosque and below, which led to a defect in the foundations and parts of it and cracked walls.
    The reformist Jews took a place to pray there since 1969 and tried to control it.
    In 1971, there were some landslides due to these excavations, and the entity set up pillars to delay its fall.
    In 2012 it dismantled to expand the area in an attempt to create a new order in Ribat, the "Jerusalem Development" project is responsible for the restoration.
    Number of excavations, tiling and restoration currently carried out in an Israeli attempt to turn it into a walled Al-Buraq, believing that there are stones from the Temple Mount to become a gathering place for extremist Zionists during the holidays and the rest of the year.
    In the year 2013, the ribat subjected to major attacks, the staff of the Israel Antiquities Authority, despite the refusal of the Jordanian government and the Islamic Waqf, refused to do so.

    The Zionist forces guarded it; the workers erected a high wooden scaffold and claimed that they were doing their work in the wall.
    The building also witnessed a daily occurrence of the extremists who call themselves "Little Kotel", during which they perform their religious rituals, the staff of the Israel Antiquities Authority, on the first day, collected the papers that they were putting together.

    The Jews were among the stones of the western wall in the Shehab Valley and began to partially encircle the wall and then removed the tiles they had laid under the Qantara Place the iron staves, placed an old tile-like tile in its place.

    The Islamic Waqf Department denied the claims of the Israeli occupation that the "Ribat al-Kurd" is a holy place for the Jews because it is a permanent property inhabited by the Shihabi family and the Jews have no right to it.

     

  • Al-Ribat Al Mansouri (Habs Al-Ribat)

    Landmark History:
    Mamluk era in the reign of the Mamluk Sultan Mansur Qalawun Salhi year (681 AH / 1282 AD).

    Reason of the name:
    Named Ribat Al Mansouri relative to the Mamluk Sultan Mansur Qalawun Salhi.

    Builder Name: Prince Aladdin Ayadghadi al-Basiri, under the direction of the Mamluk Sultan Al-Mansur Qalawun al-Salhi.

    It's Location in Respect of the Old Town:
    Located a few meters from Bab Al- Nazer (Bab Al-Majlis), south of Ribat Aladdin al-Busiri.
     
    Details of the shape:
    -This ligament consists of an open courtyard surrounded by a number of rooms, and mosque, spread over two opposite rows, north and south.
    The drawstring has a vaulted entrance topped by arches leading to the garage "distributor" in a cross-vaulted way leads to an open yard and a group of rooms and the mosque recently enlarged in the open square to accommodate a larger population.

    -A number of stores also attached to the warehouse to store grain.
    This Ribat was designated to the establishment of mystic men and women, and the number of neighbors in the beginning of the seventh decade of the tenth century / sixteenth century AD (86) nearby.

    Additional Information about the landmark:
    -As well as the legal arguments Waqf in Acre, Gaza, Nablus, Safad and Jerusalem, and methods of exploitation and management and the collection of revenue and distribution to the beneficiaries, and allowances of financial and in-kind guests, jobs and owners, who were often from the families of Abu Lutf and Diri and Alfteini.

    It is interesting to note that the revenues of cotton from its stakes in Acre alone amounted to 4068 pounds in the year (976 AH / 1568 AD).
    Its revenues exceeded the end of this century by the amount of (15000) Oqja - the currency prevailing in the Ottoman Empire - They did not rule out women from taking over some jobs in it.

    In the Ottoman era:
    The job turned into a prison for the arrest of the accused before they were tried, and known as the imprison of Ribat, at the end of their reign, as houses was used by Sudanese families.

    An Overview of the Landmark:
    It's located a few meters from Bab Al- Nazer (Bab Al-Majlis), south of Ribat Aladdin al-Busiri, It named Ribat Al Mansouri relative to the Mamluk Sultan Mansur Qalawun Salhi.
    It was built in Mamluk era in the reign of the Mamluk Sultan Mansur Qalawun Salhi year (681 AH / 1282 AD), by Prince Aladdin Ayadghadi al-Basiri, under the direction of the Mamluk Sultan Al-Mansur Qalawun al-Salhi.
    This ligament consists of an open courtyard surrounded by a number of rooms, and mosque, spread over two opposite rows, north and south.
    The drawstring has a vaulted entrance topped by arches leading to the garage "distributor" in a cross-vaulted way leads to an open yard and a group of rooms and the mosque recently enlarged in the open square to accommodate a larger population.

    A number of stores also attached to the warehouse to store grain.
    This Ribat was designated to the establishment of mystic men and women, and the number of neighbors in the beginning of the seventh decade of the tenth century / sixteenth century AD (86) nearby.

    As well as the legal arguments Waqf in Acre, Gaza, Nablus, Safad and Jerusalem, and methods of exploitation and management and the collection of revenue and distribution to the beneficiaries, and allowances of financial and in-kind guests, jobs and owners, who were often from the families of Abu Lutf and Diri and Alfteini.

    It is interesting to note that the revenues of cotton from its stakes in Acre alone amounted to 4068 pounds in the year (976 AH / 1568 AD).
    Its revenues exceeded the end of this century by the amount of (15000) Oqja - the currency prevailing in the Ottoman Empire - They did not rule out women from taking over some jobs in it.

    In the Ottoman era:
    The job turned into a prison for the arrest of the accused before they were tried, and known as the imprison of Ribat, at the end of their reign, as houses was used by Sudanese families.

  • Ribat Aladdin Al Busairi (Habs Al-Dam; Blood Prison)

    Landmark History:
    In the Mamluk era, year (666 AH / 1268 AD)

    Reason of the name:
    Named "Aladdin Al Busiri", after the Mamluk Prince Aladdin Ayghidi Al-Busairi. -It was called "Blood prison" because in the Ottoman era it was turned into a prison to arrest the accused before they are put on trial

    Builder Name: The Mamluk Prince Aladdin Al Busairi.

    It's Location in Respect of the Old Town:
    Located in an area known as "the prison blood" west of the school of Hassaniya north of Ribat al-Kurd, near Bab al-Nazir "Bab Al Majlis."
     
    Details of the shape:
    -It consists of an open courtyard surrounded by a room (recently expanded to accommodate a larger population) and a retreat and mosque on the southwest.
    -In order to reach this square, it passes through a beautiful entrance with arches. This entrance leads to Drakra (the square or rectangular area that follows the entrance directly and reaches the inside of the building), which is paved in a cross vaulted way.
    -Ribat has a Mihrab that is a hollow niche inside it. This house has several waqf places, including the house adjacent to the Ribat house and the courtyard adjacent to it.
    -The house adjacent to the land that stands by the market, a mill and oven in Jerusalem, a cellar in Altawaheen valley.

    The adjoining houses adjacent to the cellar and the old , the bathroom known as the parking lot, and all the tank in the city of Jerusalem, "and the restoration and rehabilitation of this building in the period (1986 - 1975)AD.
    The legal arguments show that it made waqf on 18/Rabie’ alakher/742 AH, 7October 1341 AD and his administration, and his financial and in-kind allowances, jobs, owners and many of their daily affairs were recorded.

    Past and Present:
    In the Mamluk Period:

    Dedicated to the establishment of the mystics and the poor in Jerusalem.

    The Ottoman era:
    It transferred to a prison to arrest the accused before they tried, called "blood prison" at the end of the Ottoman era, it used as a residence for families of the Sudanese Takarneh.

    In 1969, the mosque rebuilt and rehabilitated to receive the worshipers, electricity extended to it ten years later, at the beginning of the 1980s.

    An Overview of the Landmark:
    It's located in an area known as "the prison blood" west of the school of Hassaniya north of Ribat al-Kurd, near Bab al-Nazir "Bab Al Majlis." It named "Aladdin Al Busiri", after the Mamluk Prince Aladdin Ayghidi Al-Busairi. It was called "Blood prison" because in the Ottoman era it was turned into a prison to arrest the accused before they are put on trial.
    It was built in the Mamluk era, year (666 AH / 1268 AD) by the Mamluk Prince Aladdin Al Busairi.
     
    It consists of an open courtyard surrounded by a room (recently expanded to accommodate a larger population) and a retreat and mosque on the southwest. In order to reach this square, it passes through a beautiful entrance with arches. This entrance leads to Drakra (the square or rectangular area that follows the entrance directly and reaches the inside of the building), which is paved in a cross vaulted way.
    Ribat has a Mihrab that is a hollow niche inside it. This house has several waqf places, including the house adjacent to the Ribat house and the courtyard adjacent to it.
    The house adjacent to the land that stands by the market, a mill and oven in Jerusalem, a cellar in Altawaheen valley.

    The adjoining houses adjacent to the cellar and the old , the bathroom known as the parking lot, and all the tank in the city of Jerusalem, "and the restoration and rehabilitation of this building in the period (1986 - 1975)AD.
    The legal arguments show that it made waqf on 18/Rabie’ alakher/742 AH, 7October 1341 AD and his administration, and his financial and in-kind allowances, jobs, owners and many of their daily affairs were recorded.

    Past and Present:
    In the Mamluk Period:

    Dedicated to the establishment of the mystics and the poor in Jerusalem.

    The Ottoman era:
    It transferred to a prison to arrest the accused before they tried, called "blood prison" at the end of the Ottoman era, it used as a residence for families of the Sudanese Takarneh.

    In 1969, the mosque rebuilt and rehabilitated to receive the worshipers, electricity extended to it ten years later, at the beginning of the 1980s.

  • Bayram Gawish Office & Ribat (Al-Rasasia School)

    Landmark History:
    Year (947 AH / 1540 AD), during the reign of Sultan Suleiman Al-Qanoni Ottoman.

    Reason of the name:
    Named after Prince Bayram Gawish bin Mustafa. It known as the Al-Rasasia School for the use of lead to bind its dams due to lack of lime at the time of construction.
    Builder Name: Prince Bayram Gawish bin Mustafa.

    It's Location in Respect of the Old Town:
    Present at the intersection of the cross of Oqbat al-Takiya with the Wad road and the path of Bab Al-Nazir leading to Al-Aqsa Mosque on the Wad road at the square called the Ottoman square.

    Additional Information about the landmark:
    -This association was designated to housing and orphanages, and some of the legitimate arguments and documents of the Foundation for the revival of heritage and Islamic research to the care and reconstruction, and the allocation of rents in Jerusalem and the village of Bani Naim
    It maintained his post until the end of the Ottoman era, where its education function took over its role.

    -It known that after the completion of its occupation of Jerusalem in 1967, the Israeli authorities hastened to impose their educational curricula in Jerusalem, which led to the strengthening of the educational role of this building because it maintained the teaching of the Jordanian curriculum as a secondary school for male education on the second floor of the building.

    -In 1975, the Department of Awqaf in cooperation with the people of Jerusalem renovated the place and opened a library called Al-Sadqat library and its wells belong to the poor of Jerusalem, the library is still full to the present day, and this explained by the name of the al-Rasasia school, especially after the eviction of Jewish tenants. In the year 1309 AH / 1891 AD.

    An Overview of the Landmark:
    Present, It's located at the intersection of the cross of Oqbat al-Takiya with the Wad road and the path of Bab Al-Nazir leading to Al-Aqsa Mosque on the Wad road at the square called the Ottoman square. Named after Prince Bayram Gawish bin Mustafa. It known as the Al-Rasasia School for the use of lead to bind its dams due to lack of lime at the time of construction.
    It was built by Prince Bayram Gawish bin Mustafa, in  (947 AH / 1540 AD), during the reign of Sultan Suleiman Al-Qanoni Ottoman.
     
    This association was designated to housing and orphanages, and some of the legitimate arguments and documents of the Foundation for the revival of heritage and Islamic research to the care and reconstruction, and the allocation of rents in Jerusalem and the village of Bani Naim
    It maintained his post until the end of the Ottoman era, where its education function took over its role.

    It known that after the completion of its occupation of Jerusalem in 1967, the Israeli authorities hastened to impose their educational curricula in Jerusalem, which led to the strengthening of the educational role of this building because it maintained the teaching of the Jordanian curriculum as a secondary school for male education on the second floor of the building.

    In 1975, the Department of Awqaf in cooperation with the people of Jerusalem renovated the place and opened a library called Al-Sadqat library and its wells belong to the poor of Jerusalem, the library is still full to the present day, and this explained by the name of the al-Rasasia school, especially after the eviction of Jewish tenants. In the year 1309 AH / 1891 AD.

  • Al-Ribat Al-Mardini

    Landmark History:
    The early Mamluk era in 1321 AD.

    Reason of the name:
    Named after the two women from the city of Mardin, who established it.

    Builder Name: Two women from the city of Mardin were Slaves then became free, and brought to Jerusalem.

    It's Location in Respect of the Old Town:
    On the western side of Bab Hatta road to the north of the Al-Awhdia soil, overlooks the northern square of Al-Aqsa Mosque.

    Details of the shape:
    A simple building dominated by local architecture, consisting of an entrance topped by a tapered "tapered arch" that leads to a divided corridor leading to two large vaulted halls; to the west there are two rooms, which today serve as "shops" and the building is very large from the outside and the entrance is beautiful but now closed.

    Additional Information about the landmark
    It was for women, and it was designated as a place for visitors from the Upper Mesopotamia and the city of Mardin to stay in. Now, it’s a residence occupied by several families of Jerusalem, and there are two rooms used as a shop.

    An Overview of the Landmark:
    It's located on the western side of Bab Hatta road to the north of the Al-Awhdia soil, overlooks the northern square of Al-Aqsa Mosque. It named after the two women from the city of Mardin, who established it. And  built by two women from the city of Mardin were Slaves then became free, and brought to Jerusalem, in the early Mamluk era in 1321 AD.

    It's a simple building dominated by local architecture, consisting of an entrance topped by a tapered "tapered arch" that leads to a divided corridor leading to two large vaulted halls; to the west there are two rooms, which today serve as "shops" and the building is very large from the outside and the entrance is beautiful but now closed.
    It was for women, and it was designated as a place for visitors from the Upper Mesopotamia and the city of Mardin to stay in. Now, it’s a residence occupied by several families of Jerusalem, and there are two rooms used as a shop.

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