Atturab

 Atturab are pieces of land where the dead Muslims are buried. They  are fenced and building are built on them.

Atturab are characterized by geometric motifs and distinctive forms that indicate the beauty of Islamic architecture.

 The dignitaries, scientists, and the rich were very good in building them.

In the Old town, there are seven historical Turab that are spread in its areas: Turkan Khatoun, Baraka Khan, Jalekeia, Al-Sa’adi, Alset Tanshak Turab, in addition to Almuzafaria, Al-Awhadiah, and Alkilania Turab.

 

  • Pick a point from the map
  • Al Awhadia Turba

    Landmark Location:
    Located close to Bab Hatta, north of Al Aqsa Mosque.

    Landmark History:

    Dating to the Ayyubids era - year 697 AH / 1297-1398 m.

    Reason of the name:
    Named after its establisher king Alawhad Nejaddin Yusuf ibn Nasser Salah al-Din.

    Builder Name:

    Built by the king Alawhad Nejmaddin Yusuf ibn Nasser Salah al-Din.
    – This turba consists of two floors of the building; on the first floor is the mausoleum room, adjacent hallways, a water tank and a prayer house, on the second floor there are a number of different sized rooms.
    It also a school, the school played its intellectual role, rabat did the same, and the school registered in the Sharia court, which describes the turba in terms of architecture.

  • Tanshiq Al Muzafria’s Turba

    Landmark Location:
    Located in the aqabat Al-Mufti road, across Dar al-Sitt Tanshaq, specifically across the third entrance east of the Six Tenshq Palace, and the entrance of the Amara architecture in the northern side of the road to the north of the Islamic orphanage.

    Landmark History:

    In the Mamluk period (783-781 / 1382-1379).

    Reason of the name:

    It was named after a Turkish Mukluk woman named Tanshq bint Abdullah al-Muzaffariyya who established and made it waqf.

    Builder Name:

    A Turkish Mameluke woman named Tanshq bint Abdullah Al-
    Muzaffariyya.

    – It characterized by a harmonious architectural complex in its square form, reached through a beautiful Mameluke entrance in a tapered shape, the turba built of red and white stones.
    It contains the mausoleum of the woman, which located in the middle of this building and covers a beautiful dome shaped on an octagonal neck, of energies that allow lighting.
    In the southern wall of the mausoleum room, there is a beautiful stone mihrab and rich with its unique architectural elements, and for the facade of this wonderful turba design, a miniature version of the façade of the Palace of Alset Tanshq Almuzafaria.
    – The significance of this turba is clear that the love of Mrs. Tanashq of Jerusalem not limited to her life, but extended after her death.
    She wished to bury in the city of Jerusalem, adjacent to the righteous and friends who chose Jerusalem buried for them believing in his holiness and being the land of the resurrection and the sign and the publisher.
    In the year 800 AH / AD 1398 AD, she buried in her grave, which she prepared for this purpose, she presented a second architectural masterpiece that was a unique turba that still stands in Jerusalem across her palace attesting to the richness and taste of this virtuous lady who had endured Sufism and the poor of Jerusalem.

  • Al-Kilani Turba (Al-Kilani school / Dar Al-Danaf Al-Ansari)

    Landmark Location:
    Located on the north side of the Bab Al-Silsila road across a winding and gradual road, towards the turba of Hossamuddin Baraka Khan (Library Khalidiya).

    Landmark History:

    Mameluke era, year (753 AH / 1352 AD).

    Reason of the name:

    Named Al-Kilani Turba and Al-Kilani School after Prince Karad Shah Bin Shams al-Din Muhammad al-Kilani Halaji famous as "Ibn Saheb Kilan." It called Dar al-Danf al-Ansari because it used as a residential house.

    Builder Name:

    Haj Jamal Aldin Bahluban by order of Prince Qrad Shah bin Shams al-Din Muhammad al-Kilani Al-Halaji famous for "Ibn al-Sahib Kilan".
    – Consists of two layers with a front facade of the Mamluk style, it accessed through a beautiful Mameluke entrance, on either side of which is a stone seat known as the Guillotine.
    It extends over the entrance opening which covered by two shutters and a stone threshold consisting of one block, followed by three stone pillars topped by a group of three squares or rows of porches known as balconies, and the gnats made Almuqarnas. before the five-ribs of the entrance port Upper mid-cap.
    The entrance of the turba leads to a rectangle covered with a cross-vaulted shape, the entrance divided into an open courtyard, which shaped square and topped by a dome based on four pointed contracts.
    The pillars above the square filled with spherical triangles to turn the square into an octagon, from the square to the round for the erection of the dome, and the second layer reached from the open dish, is a number of rooms covered with a helicopter dome with a shallow dome
    – Consists of two layers with a front facade of the Mameluke style, it accessed through a beautiful Mameluke entrance.
    Each side has a stone seat known as the Guillotine, it extends over the opening of the entrance, which covered by two bronze-carved wooden shutters, Followed by three stone pillars topped by a group of three squares or rows of grills known as balconies.
    The gnats made of the muqarnas before heading to the five-sided entrance plate emanating from one center at the top of the middle of the tank.
    The entrance of the turba leads to a rectangular distributor covered in a vaulted manner, the entrance is then divided into an open courtyard “to the hall of the mausoleum”, which takes a square shape and topped by a dome based on four pointed contracts,
    The elements above the square filled with spherical triangles to turn the square into an octagon, move from the square to the round for the dome, and the second layer from the open dish is a number of rooms covered by a fan vault with a shallow dome.
    Current use: several families from Jerusalem like most schools inhabit the school’s status today.
    The school affected by its transformation into family housing to some increases and the loss of some of its basic features, however its gate is still as seen by the passer and the inside to the Aqsa from the door of the chain.

  • Al Jaliqia Turba

    Landmark Location:
    Located in the stair of the eye drawer, in the road of bab Alsisila at the junction of this road, Al-Wad road in Jerusalem.

    Landmark History:

    Year 707 AH / 1307 -1308 AD

    Reason of the name:

    It was named after the origin of the Rukon Dean Baibars Salhi al-Ajmi, known by Aljaleq.

    Builder Name:
    Built by Rokn al-Din Baybars Salhi Ajmi it called Algalq.
    -This turba consists of a number of rooms of varying size and area, the shrine is located in the middle of the room to the right of the interior into the turba.
    At its southern entrance, it is a rectangular mausoleum; the chamber of this mausoleum is square-shaped and turned over to an octagon to erect the dome by filling the corners of the upper square with spherical triangles.
    This room overlooks the Bab Al-Silsilah road and has a southern facade with its center, covered by iron tiles, the highest of which is a stone inscription, showing the name of its builder and the year of its construction.
    – Rukn al-Din Baybars Salhi al-Ajmi, known to the al-jaleq in Ramleh, died in the same year that he built this turba.
    He transferred to his turba in Jerusalem and buried there.

  • Baraka Khan’s Turba (Al Khalidi Library)

    Landmark Location:
    Located in the south side of the Bab Al Silsila, to the west of the House of the Salami, and in contrast to the Tazian Turba.

    Landmark History:

    The turba dates back to the Mamluk period and was built between 663-679 AH / 1265-1265 AD

    Reason of the name:

    It named after its establisher Prince Hossam din Baraka Khan

    Builder Name:

    Prince Hossam al-Din Baraka Khan, the leader of the Al-Khwarizmiya, who summoned by King Necmettin Ayyub, to help him recover Jerusalem from the hands of the Franks
    – The turba consists of an open courtyard containing three tombs of the above mentioned, located in the west of the room.
    Now used in the library Al Khalidi, the most important feature of the Barka Khan turba’s structure is its main northern facade, which overlooks the Bab al-Silsilah road, which located in the north-eastern part of which is a medium-sized entrance surrounded on each side by a stone bench known as the Guillotine.
    In the northwestern part, there are two windows above one hold the tapered, above the other chain cut.
    Current use: Al Khalidi Library (Khalidiya Library) now in use.
    – its location is important, because it’s active and old and is in the center of the social life since the days of the mamelukes. Also, it’s near Al-Aqsa mosque. It was characterized by activity and vitality around the clock.
    The builder of this turba is Prince Hussam din Baraka Khan, who was the leader of the Al-Khawarithmiya, helped liberate Jerusalem from the Crusader occupation.
    Prince Hussam al-Din continued to fight the Crusaders until he martyred in Homs in 644 AH / 1246 AD, and buried in his turba, he buried there and his sons Badr al-Din Muhammad and Husam al-Din Karah Bey, in the Mameluke era, Muhammad ibn Ahmad al-‘Alai renewed this turba and expanded it in 792 AH / 1294 AD.
    As for the Khalidiya library it built in 1899 AD (1318 AH) and founded by Haji Ragheb Al Khalidi as an Islamic waqf, in the amount of money recommended by his grandmother Khadija Khalidi, and became an atomic stand to this day.
    The Khalidiya library today characterized by a large number of manuscripts written by the lines of the authors of famous scientists, and the beautiful gilt copies, which used different colors of ink and rare copies of the Koran, this library is a real treasure.

  • Turkan Khatun’s Turba

    Landmark Location:
    across to the school of Teknizip in the first north of the path of the series of the outside of the Aqsa next to Al-Saadia turba from the west.

    Landmark History:

    In the Mameluke era (753 AH / 1352 AD).

    Reason of the name:

    It was named after Princess Turkan Khatoon, the daughter of Prince Taktai, son of Seljukai, the Uzbek she built.

    Builder Name:

    Princess "Turkan Khatun" the daughter of Prince Taktai bin Seljukai.
    – This turba is rich in decorative paintings overlooking Bab Al-Silsila Street, the façade built of white stones that turned gray to weather.
    The facade divided into two symmetrical sections, the bottom section of each section is rectangular, the window of stone thresholds, placed above it a rectangular stone fill carved with engraved geometric motifs and vegetative.
    It topped by a square stone plate with similar motifs, the most important characteristic of the Khatun turba is its main southern facade, which overlooks the Bab Al-Silasah road, which expresses the Mameluke architecture.
    the facade takes the shape of the rectangle, with two rectangular windows and two iron windows, marble decorated with fine geometric motifs, with a commemorative marble inscription bearing the name of the stand and the year of construction.
    The turba consists of two parts from the inside, the first is the south, which is a square room topped by a dome based on mural, in a it is a floral and geometric decoration similar to the existing artistic elements in the façade.
    The richness of these decorations reflects the price origin of this turba, and it is not possible to enter the turba to see a small niche with a shallow cavity and its energy in which there are fighting decorations inside the turba.
    – This land belongs to the woman Khatun in Turkish, the daughter of one of the princes of the Uzbeks.
    She is the descendant of one of the Islamic families who ruled in the east of the Islamic world known as the Golden Horn, Turkan Khatoun seems to have wanted to live in the city, jerusalem in this turba for which it was built in the belief in the status of religious Jerusalem as the land of the besieged and published.
    There is a great possibility that Torkan had passed on Jerusalem during the performance of the pilgrimage, and then decided to settle.

  • Al-Saadia Turba (Khalidi House)

    Landmark Location:
    An interview held for the Al-Tanqiziya School in the first of the northern side of the Bab Al-Silasila road outside the Al-Aqsa Mosque, near the turba of Turkan Khatun from the east.

    Landmark History:

    The Mameluke era.

    Reason of the name:

    Ascribed to its establisher Prince Saad al-Din Masoud, the son of Prince Al-Sfahlar.

    Builder Name:

    Attributed to Prince Saad Eddin Masoud bin Al-Sfhader Badr al-Din Sankar bin Abdullah Al-Jashankir Rumi, the Mosque of the Mamluk Sultan King Al-Nasir Mohammed bin Qalawun.
    -It consists of a semi-square room, topped by an archway, with a mausoleum in the center, it appears covered with a dome that replaced later by a simple traditional roof, the most important feature of the building is its beautiful Mameluke entrance, alternating with black and white stones.
    With two rows of geometric motifs above it, three rows or rows of beautiful hollow girders and a dome that hangs in the course of its symmetrical sequence, made what known Almokarsanat, with a quarter of a dome.
    – Made waqf in the year (711 AH / 1311 AD), this house now known as Khalidi House.

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