Other water sources

Al-Aqsa Mosque contains various sources of water; like wells and springs, such as AlNarinj pond, which lies between Qaytibay and Qasim Pasha springs,  King Issa tank, that was named after the Ayyubids Sultan Issa, and Al- Al-Mansoura hosing, which runs through Al-Mutahra Gate.

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  • King Issa Tank O’rwa tank

    Landmark Location: It is adjacent to the staircase of the western pillars to the south, on the western side of Al-Aqsa Mosque.

    Landmark Location relative to Dome of the rock:Southwest of the Dome of the Rock.

    Landmark History:In the year 607 AH / 1210 AD, the inscription is also mentioned on the entrance to the tank room, in the Ayyubid period.

    Reason of the name:Named after the person who built it.

    Builder Name: Muhammad bin O’rwa Al-Musli, during the time of the Ayyubid sultan Issa.

    Details of the shape:
    It is three separate lower hallways with cutouts, one of which extends beneath the Rock’s nave to the east.

    Additional Information about the landmark:
    -The tank was used to collect the rain water falling on the ground of the Rock’s nave through channels that feed the tank. One of the three alleys was used during the Mamluk period as a storehouse for Al-Aqsa Mosque and the last mosque of the Hanbalis. It was then abandoned for a period of time and later turned into a storeroom for the mosque’s gardens. One part of it is currently used as a medical clinic, supporting the medical clinic in the north, and the bigger part of it serves as offices of the Jordanian Ministry of Waqf and Islamic Affairs.

    -King issa tank was named after the person who built it.

    -It is located in the southwest side of the Dome of the Rock. Muhammad bin O’rwa built it during the time of the Ayyubid sultan Issa, in 607 Ah  1210 AD. The tank was used to collect the rain water falling on the ground of the Rock’s nave through channels that feed the tank. One of the three alleys was used during the Mamluk period as a storehouse for Al-Aqsa Mosque and the last mosque of the Hanbalis. It was then abandoned for a period of time and later turned into a storeroom for the mosque’s gardens. One part of it is currently used as a medical clinic, supporting the medical clinic in the north, and the bigger part of it serves as offices of the Jordanian Ministry of Waqf and Islamic Affairs.

     

    An Overview of the Landmark:

    The Southern Ablution of the Dome of Al-Nahweya. Named because it is located in the southern side, Department of Islamic Waqf., At the end of the 20thcentury.

    A large ablution facility with 35 water taps. In front of it are marble chairs used by people during wudoo’; ablution. It is considered one of the largest means of ablution, where stone cubes were placed for people to sit in front of the taps.

    The south of the dome of Al-nahwaya, ablution place, was named because it is located in the south side, built by the department of islamic endowments, at the end of the 20th century, it is considered to be like a large bowl with 35 faucetsand marble chairs for use by people during wudoo; ablution’. It is considered one of the greatest means of ablution, where stone cubes were placed to sit the ablutions in front of the taps.

  • The Bitter Orange Pond

    Landmark Location: It is located in front of Al-Ashrfya school, Qait Bey and Qasem Basha springs, to the south of AL-Aqsa mosque.

    Landmark Location relative to Dome of the rock: South of the Dome of the Rock.

    Landmark History:The Ottoman period, it was repaired by the Supreme Islamic Council in 1340 AH 1922 AD.

    Reason of the name:The existence of bitter orange trees neatoof it, during its construction.

    Builder Name: The Ottomans.

     Details of the shape:
     -A square shaped pond with a length of 7 meters and a size of ​​49 meters.
    -Its ground and walls were paved with marble, and there are a fountain in the center, a metal railing, and24 faucets around the pond for ablution.

     Additional Information about the landmark:
    -Naming:
    Al-Arif mentioned it with the name of Al-narinj or Al-Ghajnj, a distortion of the word Al-Narang as demonstrated by Dr. Kamel Al-Asali in record 205 from the records of theIslamic Court and the following is stated:“To Al Aqsa Mosque, Al-Kaas and Al-Narinj pond, which is in the mosque. AlNrainj is a kind of citrus that resembles orange”.

    -Some historians believe that pond dates back to the Mamluk period, based on what Mujair al-Din said in the presence of his facades south of the Qaitbay mausoleum. This does not apply to the pool, as we explained in the hadith of Qasim Basha. It is likely that the building of the pond dates back to the Ottoman period, where Sheikh Abdul Ghani Al Nabulsi described it as saying: “The mentioned school turned to the Hanabla mosque,
    where the five prayers are delivered separately, and in front of it is a large pool fed by water from a fountain in the middle of it. For those who want ablution, there are water pipes near it”.
    -It was supplied with water from the nearby Qassem Basha waterway reservoir. The pond was later dried.

    An Overview of the Landmark:
    An-Narinj Pond is a square-shaped pond. It’s 7 meters long and its area is 49 square meters. Its ground and walls were paved with marble, and there is a fountain in the center, a metal railing, and 24 faucets around the pond for ablution. It is located in front of Al-Ashrfya school, Qait Bey and Qasem Basha springs, south of AL-Aqsa mosque and the Dome of the Rock. In the Ottoman period, it was restored by the Supreme Islamic Council in 1340 AH 1922 AD. Perhaps that it got its name from the Narinj trees (Bitter Orange) trees next to it.

    Naming:
    Al-Arif mentioned it with the name of Al-narinj or Al-Ghajnj, a distortion of the word Al-Narang as demonstrated by Dr. Kamel Al-Asali in record 205 from the records of the Islamic Court and the following is stated:
    “To Al Aqsa Mosque, Al-Kaas and Al-Narinj pond, which is in the mosque. AlNrainj is a kind of citrus  that resembles orange”.

    Some historians believe that pond dates back to the Mamluk period, based on what Mujair al-Din said in the presence of his facades south of the Qaitbay mausoleum. This does not apply to the pool, as we explained in the hadith of Qasim Basha. It is likely that the building of the pond dates back to the Ottoman period, where Sheikh Abdul Ghani Al Nabulsi described it as saying: “The mentioned school turned to the Hanabla mosque, where the five prayers are delivered separately, and in front of it is a large pool fed by water from a fountain in the middle of it. For those who want ablution, there are water pipes near it”. It was supplied with water from the nearby Qassem Basha waterway reservoir. The pond was later dried.

  • The Ablution Al-seqaya AL-Mansorya

    Landmark Location: It can be reached from outside Al-Aqsa mosque’s borders.

    Landmark Location relative to Dome of the rock: Southwest the dome of the rock.

    Landmark History:
    589 AH 1193 AD in the ayyubid era.

    Reason of the name:
    Named after Sultan Al-Mansour Qalawoun.

    Builder Name: Al-Adil king, Abu baker, brother of Salah Al-Din, ordered its construction.

    Details of the shape:
    -The only building left of the Ayyubid building where there is an inscription dating to the construction and was supplied with water through the Canal, renewed Prince Alaa Al-Din Al-Basiri in 666 AH / 1268 AD and called on behalf of the Al-Mansawiya Al-Sakayyah the proportion of Sultan Al-Mansour Qalawun.

    -The traveler Ibn Fadlullah al-‘Umari described it in 746 AH / 1345 AD, beside this hallway, there is the door of purity. It includes two Taharites, one for women and the other for men. The male Taharite includes twenty-three houses and a large fountain.

    -It is reported that the women’s cleaner is above men’s cleaner. During the Ottoman time, it was called “cleaner”, and it was renovated and expanded several times by the Supreme Islamic Council and then recently by the Reconstruction Committee of Awqaf, in order to keep up with the increase of the number of worshipers, especially in Ramadan.

    An Overview of the Landmark:
    This ablution place can be reached through Al-Mutaharah Gate outside the walls of Al-Aqsa Mosque. Al-Adil king, Abu baker, brother of Salah Al-Din, ordered its construction, in 589 AH 1193 AD in the ayyubid era. The only building left of the Ayyubid building where there is an inscription dating to the construction and was supplied with water through the Canal, renewed Prince Alaa Al-Din Al-Basiri in 666 AH / 1268 AD and called on behalf of the Al-Mansawiya Al-Sakayyah the proportion of Sultan Al-Mansour Qalawun. The traveler Ibn Fadlullah al-'Umari described it in 746 AH / 1345 AD, beside this hallway, there is the door of purity. It includes two Taharites, one for women and the other for men. The male Taharite includes twenty-three houses and a large fountain.

    It is said that the women’s cleaner is above men’s cleaner. During the Ottoman time, it was called “cleaner”, and it was renovated and expanded several times by the Supreme Islamic Council and then recently by the Reconstruction Committee of Awqaf, in order to keep up with the increase of the number of worshipers, especially in Ramadan.

     

  • Bab Hetta Cleaner

    Landmark Location: In the north side of AL-Aqsa mosque.

    Landmark Location relative to Dome of the rock: Northern of the Dome of the Rock.

    Reason of the name: It is near to Bab Hetta.

    Additional Information about the landmark:
    The truth is, it is not an original cleaner, The Imam Al-Shantamiti allowed using it as a cleaner starting from the end of the Ottoman era. A mihrab was added to its southern courtyard in the 1930s. It was renovated after the demolition by members of the Al-Aqsa Foundation for the Reconstruction of Islamic Holy Sites in 1416 AH 1996 AD , under the patronage of the Islamic Waqf Department. They gave the lower part for women, and the upper for males.

    An Overview of the Landmark:
    Bab Hitta Ablution Place is located north of Al-Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of the Rock. It got its name from its location near Hitta gate. The truth is that it’s not originally an ablution place. The Imam Al-Shantameti allowed using it as an ablution place starting from the end of the Ottoman era. A southern court was added to it in 1930s. It was renovated after the demolition by members of the Al-Aqsa Foundation for the Reconstruction of Islamic Holy Sites in 1416 AH 1996 AD , under the patronage of the Islamic Waqf Department. They gave the lower part for women, and the upper for males.

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